Trinity Marina reviews: Friendly helpful staff and second to none service!

Trinity Marina reviews: Friendly helpful staff and second to none service!

Trinity Marina Reviews

Service with a smile!

We are proud of some of the excellent Trinity Marina reviews our customers have left for us online.  If you are trying to decide whether to sell a narrowboat through our brokerage service, or buy a secondhand narrowboat from us, you can rest assured that you are in safe hands at Trinity Marinas.   Maybe you are already a canal boat owner and are looking for somewhere to head out for on your next trip, where you will receive a warm welcome and great rates on overnight moorings.  Our staff at at the marina are all extremely knowledgeable in their field. You will always be greeted with a smile and someone is always available to chat to you about all things narrowboat!

Here are some of the lovely reviews some of our customers have left for us on Google.

“Excellent customer service staff so friendly nothing is too much trouble for them.  All services you need.  Will most definitely stay again.”
Pat Preston via Google

“I attended the open day on the 13th May. The staff were really helpful and welcoming, especially to someone very new to Narrowboats and Canal-life. As someone who is thinking seriously about purchasing a liveaboard, they gave me several hints and tips and much food for thought as well as unfettered access to a number of different boats currently for sale. All it’s done is whetted my appetite further!”
Tim Esplan via Facebook

“The staff at this Marina were excellent, very personable, attentive and helpful.  As someone who was looking to purchase a liveaboard I had many questions and concerns, all of which were answered by the guys here. Having looked at many different brokerages and marinas in my quest for a boat that would suit me, here I found the one. Thanks guys n gals!”
Adi Barber via Facebook

“A friendly marina with good facilities.”
Robert Kelly via Google

“My husband and I moored here over the Easter Weekend … Absolutely everyone was fabulous, so kind and helpful and being complete novices I’m sure we tested their ‘helpometer’ lol. Beautiful place and a nice little town too! Everything you could wish for within walking distance.”
Ayshea Pinky Pressley via Facebook

We would be delighted if you would leave us a review on Google too, which you can do by clicking on this link.  Or if you are on Facebook, hop over to our Facebook and give us a like and leave us a Facebook review too!

Get in touch with us

If you would like more information about any of our services and facilities at the Marina, please don’t hesitate to contact us by telephone on 01455 896820 or via our contact form on the website.

The staff here at Trinity Marinas would like to wish all of our customers, old and new, a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

What’s in the Name of a Boat?

What’s in the Name of a Boat?

There is often confusion around the names given to the types of boats we see on the waterways around Trinity Marinas. Is it canal boat? Narrowboat? Barge? Well, none are wrong; it is simply personal choice which term you use.

Technically, a barge is slightly different to a canal boat and narrowboat, as it is wider, but we hear them all! We also like to hear all the wonderful personal names that are given to boats.

If you have chosen to live your life on the water, you want your boat to have a name that is personal to you and that can make it your home. If you have a new boat built for you, then you can choose a name at the time of building so it can be added on by a signwriter.

But what if you buy a pre-loved boat that already has a name?

You may like the name it is, and choose to keep it. Or you may want to make it personal to you. Some say it is unlucky to change the name of a boat whilst it is in the water, so if you are superstitious, you could change the name whilst the boat is having any repairs done, as this will likely mean it will be out of the water.

It is believed that this superstition came from a time when it was required to rename wooden ships. This involved the old name being removed by planing the timber and the new one burnt in. Over time, this weakened the timbers and the boat was susceptible to sinking in a storm.

If you are not superstitious, it is fairly easy to change the name of your boat and some people even have a renaming ceremony. We’d love to hear your stories if this is something you have done!

To change the name of your boat, you need to inform British Waterways and give them the boat’s current name, registration number and the new name you want for your boat.

You also need to inform your insurance company quoting your policy number.

The name you choose for your boat may not be unique. As British Waterways knows boats by their number rather than their name, there is no requirement to choose one that doesn’t exist already. The five most common names for canal boats are:

  1. Kingfisher
  2. Dragonfly
  3. Merlin
  4. Willow
  5. Phoenix

Some more unusual ones that we have heard of are:

  • May Contain Nuts
  • My Newt
  • Sally Slap Cabbage
  • Wider Wake
  • She got the house

We’d love to hear if you have an unusual name for your boat!

If you need any extras for your boat, you can find all our canal boat accessories on our Chandlery Marine shop.

 

Are you locked in this winter?

Are you locked in this winter?

Experienced boaters reading this may already be prepared, but for the few who are new to the narrow boat life, you may be interested to learn that during the winter is the prime time for locks to undergo repairs and other works.

This means that throughout the colder months many locks will be closed for a variety of periods, which means that cruising activity will be reduced. If you choose to moor in an area surrounded by locks, you will be very much restricted with your movement on the canals, however for those of you that have chosen to moor with us at Trinity Marina you will not experience too much of an issue. We are based on the Ashby canal, which provides you with an astounding 22 miles (35km) of unlocked cruising.

For those of you that do not plan to be moored with us, we have provided a full list of winter closures* for the East Midlands and surrounding areas, in date order:

07/11/2016 – 14/11/2016
Bridge 34 , Branston Road Bridge (Towpath is also closed)
Construction of a new bridge which is part of the Branston Lock development near
Burton on Trent.

07/11/2016 – 16/12/2016
Lock 39, Aylestone Mill Lock
Replacing the top and bottom gates. Brickwork repairs in the lock chamber.

05/12/2016 – 20/01/2017
Bridge 42A , Railway (Towpath is also closed)
Replacing a 4 lane railway bridge.

04/01/2017 – 26/02/2017
Lock 17, Junction Lock (Towpath is also closed)
Gate leakage repairs, Brick and masonry repairs in and around the lock chamber.

09/01/2017 – 20/01/2017
Lock 18, Kibworth Top Lock
Lock 19, Gas Pipe Lock
To refit the top gates at Kibworth Top Lock, and to repair the lock chamber at Gas Pipe Lock.

09/01/2017 – 19/02/2017
Lock 5, Swarkestone Lock (Towpath is also closed)
Gate and paddles repair.

09/01/2017 – 26/02/2017
Lock 2, Sharlow Lock
Lock 3, Aston Lock (Towpath is also closed)

16/01/2017 – 24/02/2017
Park Farm Culvert (Towpath is also closed)
Reconstruction of the culvert across the canal line.

23/01/2017 – 10/03/2017
Locks 12 & 13, Glascote Top and Bottom Locks (Towpath is also closed)
Lock leakage repairs on Lock 12. Replacement of top and bottom gates at Lock 13 aswell as brickwork repairs to the lock chamber.

23/01/2017 – 03/02/2017
Lock 22, Cranes Lock
To refit the top gates.

30/01/2017 – 10/02/2017
Minworth Embankment (Towpath is also closed)
To carry out investigation works in preparation for future repairs.
06/02/2017 – 17/02/2017
Lock 27, Turnover Lock
To refit the top and bottom lock gates.

13/02/2017 – 17/02/2017
Lock 3, Coventry Canal
Gate reline works, Silt removal and fence installation.

20/02/2017 – 03/03/2017
Lock 28, Tythorne Lock
Replacement of the bottom gates.

Remember to take these closures into consideration these coming months and plan your journeys accordingly.

*The winter closure information was taken from the Canal and River Trusts website www.canalrivertrust.org.uk.

New Arrival – Bargeburger – a Unique Opportunity

New Arrival – Bargeburger – a Unique Opportunity

A new arrival this week is Bargeburger, a 30ft Butty Margot.  This unique boat is being sold as a going concern, selling street food gourmet burgers on the the banks of the River Soar in Leicester City.  Located just along the bank from Leicester City Football Club, football fans buy a homemade burger on the way to or on the way back from a match.  The business comes with a full trading licence and free moorings at Castle Gardens.  The Bargeburger currently sells at 22 matches throughout the Season and also various festivals, however there is a huge opportunity to grow this business.  ‘The world is your oyster’  Call 01455 896820 for further details.

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